Tuesday, October 5, 2021

1842 Document Appointing Haven A. Butler of Berwick, Maine, Musician of the Regimental Band in Maine Militia


Document dated 10 September 1842 at South Berwick, Maine, certifying the appointment of Haven A. Butler of Berwick, Maine, as Musician of the Regimental Band in the 2nd Regiment of the 1st Brigade of the 1st Division of the Maine Militia.  Signed by Colonel John Cobbey.




Col. John Cobbey  - possibly Col. John Cobbey (1816-1873), whose gravestone shows his surname as Cobby.

From the 31 July 1841 issue of The Farmer's Monthly Visitor:



If you have information to share on either of these men, please leave a comment for the benefit of other researchers.

Sunday, September 26, 2021

Newspaper Clipping about Theodore Lincoln of Dennysville, Maine, & the 6th Maine in the Civil War

Newspaper clipping about Major Theodore Lincoln, Jr., a Dennysville, Maine, native, and officer in the Sixth Maine.  

Note: Rather than Theodore Lincoln, Jr., I believe he was that man's son Theodore Lincoln III (1830-1865) as this Maine veterans cemetery record indicates. Many military records refer to him as a Jr.

Found in a journal of underlying handwriting pasted over with many clippings, presumably by someone sympathetic to the Union and with abolitionist leanings.

A transcription appears at the end of this post.

Theodore Lincoln III (1830-1865) was the son of Theodore Lincoln, Jr., (1800-1867) and Elizabeth Cushing Lincoln (1800-1877). Theodore III was the great grandson, as the article notes, of Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810) was the celebrated Revolutionary War General to whom Cornwallis' second offered his surrender at Yorktown.

If you have information to share on any of the people mentioned above, please leave a comment for the benefit of other researchers.  

Perhaps a reader will know if Theodore Lincoln III came home from the War in 1864 with lingering illness or injury, which contributed to his death in 1865.

Transcription:
SIXTH MAINE
This regiment, with 90 men, under command of Major Theodore Lincoln, Jr., also came in the Weybosset [a steam ship]. Major Lincoln is a great grandson of Major General Benjamin Lincoln of the revolution, to whom Lord Cornwallis surrendered. Major Lincoln has been with the regiment ever since its formation, entering it as Orderly Sergeant. He has passed through many severe battles, beginning at Yorktown, and ending with one of the last skirmishes before Petersburg. Of the original regiment of one thousand there are only about seventy left, and of these Major Lincoln is one. He has passed unwounded through his numerous battle, though repeatedly greatly exposed. Few of our young officers have rendered more effectual service, or shown a cooler and more determined bravery in action. He has the confidence of his men, and we trust there are higher military honors in reserve for him.

Saturday, September 25, 2021

Two Period Newspaper Articles about the Confederates Raids in Eastern Maine

Two period newspaper clippings about the raids in Eastern Maine, carried out or proposed, by Confederates massing in Saint John, New Brunswick, during the Civil War.

The clippings mention
  • Saint John, New Brunswick
  • Calais, Maine
  • Eastport, Maine
  • Belfast, Maine (to whose leaders a warning was sent from Eastport)

The clippings are contained in a notebook, the original handwriting in which is covered over by many newspaper clippings that appear to have been pasted there by someone with Union and abolitionist sentiments.

Transcription of the clipping at top:

A LITTLE RAID IN MAINE - ATTEMPT TO ROB THE CALAIS BANK. Calais, Me., 18th
At midday today there was an attempt to rob the Calais Bank by a small party of rebel raiders, who came from St. John, N.B. Three of them were arrested. The leader of the gang is Capt. Collins of the 15th Mississippi regiment. They say some thirty associates promised to meet them here, but failed. The vigilance of the State Guard prevented the consummation of this bold scheme of pillage. The three men have been committed. The citizens are arming in expectation of an attack tonight.

The second clipping:


Transcription:

EXCITEMENT ON THE BORDER OF EASTERN MAINE
Rebel Raid Apprehended

The St. Croix Herald, published at Calais, Me., represents that a general excitement pervades the towns on the eastern boundary of Maine, growing out of an apprehended foray by rebel refugees in the British Provinces. The Herald of 23d says:
"The towns on this border have been alive with excitement during the past few days and nights owing to well authenticated reports that a raid was in contemplation by rebel agents and "roughs" who had their headquarters at St. John. We were reliably informed when in St. John a few days ago that the programme of rebel operations consisted not only in the taking of the Chesapeake but also the steamer New England, and then making a raid upon the towns on the border, robbing the banks and committing general destruction by fire, robbery, etc. The failure to take the New England rather strengthened the impression that the raid on the borders would be attempted, and accordingly on Thursday night the people here and at Eastport organized for home defense.
There was any number of citizens ready to volunteer, and the every effort was made to give the invaders a warm reception. A company of about seventy men was raised for the emergency, consisting of nine months' men and State Guards, under the command of Capt. Flint. Their rendezvous was at the Armory. Squads of the men were detailed for picket duty at the several bridges and other exposed stations leading from New Brunswick, through which channel the rebs intended to find their way into our city. At intervals during the night of Thursday, as reports came in to the headquarters from the various outposts, intense excitement was manifested, and strong hopes were entertained that is the invaders were really coming they would come then and there.
The night was stormy and the guards, notwithstanding they were unaccustomed to the service, entered into the work with much zeal and enthusiasm. Between three and four in the morning a fire broke out and destroyed an old building somewhere in the rear of the town of St. Stephen. It was thought by some that it was intended as a decoy, but it didn't take as the guards had orders not to leave the city. It was supposed that some suspicious persons, the advanced guard of the enemy's forces, were prowling about the city, and the Provost Marshal was directed to make a search at the Exchange where the suspected men were stopping, but there was nothing discovered that would implicate the parties. Toward morning the guards descried some men lurking about the post office, but no arrests were made.
Thus ended the first night of the watch for the invaders. Their non-appearance was regretted, as many of our boys were 'splilin' [presumably 'spoilin'] for a right, and unless the raiders had come in overpowering numbers, but few of them would have lived to tall the tale of the adventure. Men have since been detailed nightly for the service, and the tread of armed men through our streets at the midnight hour has recently become one of the features of life on the border. At Eastport, the citizens are also wide awake, and a large force patrol the streets and guard the town nightly. There can be no doubt, from information received on the subject from various sources, that such a rain as we have been preparing for has been and is in actual contemplation. It will not do to slumber as we are yet by no means secure from danger."

The Provost Marshal of Belfast has received a letter from Eastport, which says:
"Last night almost every man and boy in Eastport went armed, and a guard of sixty men was kept in Frontier Bank all night. It seems a large party of roughs left St. John for some place, and a remark made by them was overheard before they left, that they were going to rob a bank in the United States, within sixty miles of St. John."

The citizens of Eastport telegraphed to Augusta for seventy-five rifles or muskets."

At this time, the Army still maintained Fort Sullivan in Eastport on Moose Island, although it was much reduced in readiness.

If you have information to share, please leave a comment.

Thursday, August 19, 2021

Pembroke, Maine: 1834 & 1841 Docs/Letters: Adna Leighton, Dennerson James Haynes (Smithfield ME); William Woodworth, Ephraim Woodworth, Jacob Gardner, Ebenezer Swan, Mr. Tarbill

One 1834 document and two 1841 letters concerning people from the Pembroke, Maine, area and Smithfield, Maine.

Names: [some appear multiple times]
  • Adna Leighton (1801-1891) of Pembroke, Maine
  • Dennerson James Haynes (1784-1868) of Smithfield, Maine
  • Jacob Gardner, who may have been Jacob Dunbar Gardner (1797-1844) of Charlotte, Maine
  • Ebenezer Swan, who may have been Ebenezer Swan (1775-1880)
  • Mr. Tarbill, presumably Mr. Tarbell
  • William Lewis Woodworth, Sr. (1796-1879), a Nova Scotia native who moved to Pembroke, Maine
  • Ephraim Woodworth, who may have been the Ephraim Woodworth (abt 1826-abt 1901), who was the son of William Lewis Woodworth, Sr. (1796-1879)
  • Leonard - possibly Leonard Woodworth, who was a brother to William Lewis Woodworth, Sr. (1796-1879)

The Leighton, Haynes and Woodworth families were connected through marriage.  Dennerson James Haynes and Adna Leighton married sisters, Rebecca (Woodworth) and Amy (Woodworth), respectively. William Lewis Woodworth, Sr. was a brother to Rebecca and Amy.

Shown at top:
Document with dates of January 29, 1834 and February 8, 1834, acknowledging receipt by Dennerson James Haynes (1784-1868) of Smithfield, Maine, of $34.47, comprising the notes owed by Jacob Gardener [Gardner] and Ebenezer Swan, and signed by Adna Leighton (1801-1891) of Pembroke, Maine.  

Jacob Gardner may have been Jacob Dunbar Gardner (1797-1844) of Charlotte, Maine. Ebenezer Swan may have been Ebenezer Swan (1775-1880).  [Either Ebenezer's birth year is incorrect or the newspaper clipping quoted on his FindaGrave memorial as noting his age of 104 is incorrect.]

Reverse of document at top:


Below:
Letter dated August 12, 1841, from Adna Leighton (1801-1891) at Pembroke, Maine, to Dennerson James Haynes (1784-1868) at Smithfield, Maine.  Adna mentions Mr. Tarbill [perhaps Tarbell] and Ephraim Woodworth, who may have been the son of William Lewis Woodworth, Sr., who was a brother to the wives of Adna Leighton and Dennerson James Haynes.  



Transcription:

Pembro. Aug 12 1841
Dear Brother [Brother-in-law]
An apology is due you from me for not informing you concerning your business entrusted to me. I wrote a letter which you will find enclosed, acknowledging the receipt of your letter and ___ I see no chance to get anything from Mr. Tarbill. I understand he owns no property, but I do not know for certainty. I wish you to write by Ephraim Woodworth the bearer of this letter what you wish me to do. We are all well and our folks here.
Yours in haste
A. Leighton

Below:
Letter dated August 12, 1841 from William Woodworth (1796-1879) at Pembroke, Maine, to Dennerson James Haynes (1784-1868) at Smithfield, Maine. Mentions Adna Leighton (1801-1891) and Ephraim Woodworth, who may have been William's son but is not described as such.  William Lewis Woodworth was a brother to the wives of Dennerson James Haynes and Adna Leighton. No writing on the reverse.


Transcription:

Pembroke August 12, 1841
Dear Friend [or Friends]
I Received your letter yesterday and take this opportunity to write you a few lines in answer. My family are as well as could be expected. My wife was confined the sixth. We have got another girl [Amelia Rebecca Woodworth (1841-1917)] and she is comfortable as could be expected. You inform me that you have been to see Leonard. I am glad to hear from him. I should have wrote to him before this, but was not sure what town he lived in. I have spoken to Adna Leighton concerning the business you mentioned in your letter and you will receive a letter from him at the same time you receive this. My health is pretty good this summer. The last summer I was unable to do any work the whole season. As to our crops, Hay is remarkable good but it is found that on account of the drouth grain and potato crops will be light. My wife and family join me in wishing to be remembered to you all. I send this by Ephraim Woodworth and write in haste as the stage is expected any minute. 
Mr. Dennerson Haynes
Affectionately yours,
William Woodworth

If you have information to share on any of these men, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Thursday, August 12, 2021

1834, Lubec, Maine - Memorial of Inhabitants of Lubec re: Rechartering the Bank of the U.S. - Currency; 32 Names

1834 U.S. Government publication containing a request signed by 32 inhabitants, presumably merchants and professionals, of Lubec, Maine.  


Memorial of Inhabitants of Lubec, Maine, in favor of rechartering the Bank of the United States
March 17, 1834
Referred to the Committee of Ways and Means

The names, shown below, are not recorded in alphabetical order, but a list in alphabetical order follows the image.  If you have information to share on any of the men named, please leave a comment.
Names in Alphabetical Order - Note: There appears to be at least one error in a name - check the entire list if you are searching for someone you think should be here.

AJohn AndrewsJJames JordanSJohn Sampson
BElisha BroadKEzra KnightEbenezer Scott
CLevi CaswellLSamuel A. LawrenceJoseph Sumner
William ChaceMZenos Morton, Jr.TStephen Thacher
William ChalonerJabez MowryWJoseph Whitney
DClement DinsmorePWilliam Phelps
James DinsmoreRAndrew Ring
FI. B. FlintCharles L. Ring
GJob GibbsJoseph Robinson
Thomas O. GloverSamuel Root
HJeremiah HamiltonDaniel Rumery
Clement HuckingsStephen Rumery
John R. HuckingsThomas Rumery
Sandford M. Hunt

Transcription

Memorial of Inhabitants of Lubec, Maine, in favor of rechartering the Bank of the United States
March 17, 1834
Referred to the Committee of Ways and Means

The undersigned inhabitants of the town of Lubec, in the State of Maine, take leave, most respectfully, to request an audience of the honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled.

They do not come forward to announce the actual existence of a state of things which cannot and will not be borne by the people of this country. This truth has already been proclaimed in every city and hamlet in the United States; it is seen in the wide-spread ruin which is marching over the land; it is heard in the cry of distress which rings from the remote West to the extreme East. Nor is it their purpose to proclaim the near approach of a fearful crisis, which must shake this confederacy of States to its centre; which already threatens the stability of the Government; which, indeed, menaces the country itself with convulsion and revolution. But their object in appearing before the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled, is to state their own sufferings, their consternation, and despair. Confidence is prostrated, credit is at an end, there is no circulation. Business is in a manner suspended; we can see no end to the present state of things; there is no prospect of its termination; a dark cloud rests upon the future. There has been a sudden and terrible change, from a state of high prosperity to the calamities, the sufferings, the dismay, and desperation of the present moment. If there is any remedy for the evils which are now crushing the country in the dust, it must be in the voice of the people, in the power of Congress, and a fixed purpose to maintain the sanctity and the supremacy of the laws.

The undersigned must respectfully ask, that the public treasure be restored to the place where the Congress of the United States have decreed that it should be kept; and they desire that it may be surrounded with new guards. In common with their fellow-citizens, they ask for a currency such as the public necessities require, which shall be the same everywhere, and which can only be furnished by a national bank. Past experience has fully tested the necessity of such an institution.

The undersigned venture to express their opinion that the present Bank of the United States ought to be rechartered. If it had consulted its interests merely, instead of the duty which it owed to the public, it would scarcely have withstood the inducements which were held out to it to become the ally of a triumphant party. It has perhaps, indeed, saved the country from despotism, by refusing to yield the purse to the same hand which grasped the sword. They feel themselves compelled to add to that, they deem the assertion which has been promulgated from high places that the public distress is merely the wilful act of the Bank to be an insult on their understandings, and a mockery of their sufferings. It is a device which can never take with the intelligent people of the United States.

The undersigned, confidently appeal to the wisdom and patriotism, and firm determination of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled.

Wednesday, August 11, 2021

1880s Autograph Album of Ida Moore, Student at Decorah Institute at Decorah, Iowa

 

1880s autograph album of Ida Moore (1868-1920), a student at Decorah Institute at Decorah, Iowa.  Inscribers hailed mostly from Iowa, with three from Minnesota, and one each from Nebraska and Wisconsin. 

Ida wrote her name and address on the inside back cover, along with the note: To read when I am old and grey.


The album measures approximately 6"by 4" and contains the sentiments of over 80 of Ida's relatives, friends, schoolmates and teachers.  An alphabetical list of the inscribers, together with any personal information they offered, appears at the end of this post.

Surnames in the Album

? [7]JJeraldRRichards
BBachelderJewell [3]Rierson
BillingsJohnsonSSallee [4]
BoydKKearnsSchmidt
Bridge [3]KirkScott [3]
CChild [2]LLarsonSeverson [2]
ColemanLinzenmeyerShulze
CoughlinLoweTThompson
DD?MMcCarthyTillotson
EEideMerrill [2]Tuttle [2]
ElwickMoore [3]WWeymouth
EricksonMottWhiteman [2]
GGardnerNNarumWilson
GullicksonNelson [2]
HHaas [3]Ness
HansohnNodshilder
Headington [5]OOdson [3]
HeggOlson
Hesla [2]PPedersen
HitchcockPuntney

Ida Moore was born 19 January 1868 in Decorah, Iowa, the daughter of Charles Oscar Moore and Gustava (Erickson) Moore. Two of Ida's brothers inscribed pages in her album.

Brother Henry inscribed a page.

Brother Louis Moore inscribed a page but he was young, and his handwriting is not easy to decipher.

One of the inscribers, F. M. Jewell, who penned his page on March 20, 1886 at Decorah, Iowa, noted: "True friends are jewells but like jewels are scarce".


Fittingly, Ida and
Franklin M. Jewell married at Decorah, Iowa, on 9 September 1891. They would have, I believe, three children, one of whom, Emily Jewell, "Emma", inscribed a page in the album.


Ida died in 1920 and Frank in 1941. They're buried with Ida's parents in the Phelps Cemetery in Decorah, Iowa.

Teachers who inscribed pages:
  • Moses Billings
  • Annis Mott
  • F. B. Tillotson

If you have corrections and/or additions to the above or information or research to share on any of the people listed below, please leave a comment.

Alphabetical List of Inscribers

  • Mary ?, possibly Mary Daley, Dalvey or Dalen, of Calmar, Iowa. Middle initial could be J or I. She was Ida's seatmate
  • Emma
  • Name unclear
  • Hammond ? Emma, possibly Emma W. (S); Ida's seatmate, presumably at Decorah Institute
  • Peter Nar?, possibly Peter Narum; inscribed at Decorah Institute on February 6, 1886 Robert
  • Mary Bachelder of Castalia, Iowa; inscribed at Decorah Institute on February 11, 1886. Ida's friend and schoolmate 
  • Moses Billings, Ida's teacher; inscribed on December 1, 1884. Presumably Moses Billings (1862-1921)
  • D. Boyd; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on September 6, 1886
  • Allie Bridge; inscribed on January 20, 1884 at Decorah, Iowa
  • Allie Bridge; inscribed on January 2, 1885
  • Priscilla Bridge; inscribed on December 28, 1883
  • Estella Child of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on December 19, 1885
  • Charlie Child of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on December 19, 1885
  • Atta L. Coleman; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on July 17, 1884
  • Kate G. Coughlin; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on October 5, 1885; Ida's schoolmate
  • Mary ?, possibly Mary Daley, Dalvey or Dalen, of Calmar, Iowa. Middle initial could be J or I. She was Ida's seatmate
  • Lina Eide of Bratsberg, Minnesota; inscribed at Decorah Institute on January 26, 1886
  • Thomas Elwick; inscribed on March 4, 1886 at Decorah, Iowa
  • Caroline Erickson of Springwater, Iowa; inscribed on February 20, 1885
  • Mabel I. Gardner of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on May 17, 1885
  • Christine Gullickson; inscribed on February 10, 1886 at Decorah Institute; Ida's schoolmate
  • Julius Haas of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed in 1884 at age 9
  • Emma Haas of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed in 1884 at age 7
  • Maggie Haas; inscribed at 33rd Avenue, Decorah, Iowa, on May 19, 1885
  • Emma M. Hansohn; inscribed on January 26, 1886. Not sure of surname
  • Louise Headington; inscribed in 1884 Nellie Headington, inscribed in 1884
  • Hallie Headington Herb Headington of Decorah, Iowa
  • Winnie Headington; inscribed on May 19, 1885. Ida's schoolmate Helena Hegg
  • Ollie Hesla; not sure of surname; inscribed in 1885, at D.I., presumably Decorah, Iowa
  • Lena Hesla of Waterville, Iowa; inscribed at Decorah Institute on October 30, 1885. Not sure of surname
  • Hallie V. Hitchcock; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa
  • Emmy M. Jerald of Lime Springs, Iowa; inscribed on December 19, 1885 at Decorah, Iowa
  • ? V. E. Jewell; inscribed in October 1887. Presumably Benjamin E. Jewell (1850-1938), Ida's future brother-in-law
  • Miss Emma Jewell of Decorah, Iowa; Ida's daughter
  • F. M. Jewell; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on March 20, 1886. Presumably Frank M. Jewell. He played on his surname: "True friends are jewells but like jewels are scarce". True indeed, because Ida and Frank married on 9 September 1891! 
  • Alfred O. Johnson of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on January 2, 1887
  • Ella M. Kearns of Ossian, Iowa; inscribed at Decorah Institute on 10/8/85
  • Ida's schoolmate Nellie Kirk of Lansing, Iowa; inscribed on January 25, 1886
  • Christena Larson; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on March 3, 1884
  • Anna Linzenmeyer
  • William Lowe of Hadley, Minnesota; inscribed on January 27, 1884
  • Hattie McCarthy of Jackson Junction, Iowa; inscribed at Decorah Institute, on March 15, 1886
  • Will Merrill; inscribed on January 9, 1884
  • Nettie Merrill of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on January 9, 1884
  • Henry Moore; Ida's brother Louis Moore of Decorah, Iowa, in a year I can't make out; age ?, possibly 8. He was John Louis Moore (1877-1947), Ida's brother
  • Ida Moore, Decorah, Iowa, album owner. "To read when I am old and grey". Written on the inside back cover
  • Annis Mott; inscribed in 1886 and directed to Ida, "Dear teacher". Possibly the Annis Mott who married Martin Ellingson in 1894
  • Peter Nar?, possibly Peter Narum; inscribed at Decorah Institute on February 6, 1886
  • Anna Nelson; inscribed at Decorah Institute on April 7, 1885
  • John N. Nelson; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa
  • A. J. Ness; inscribed on March 18, no year written; Ida's uncle
  • H. Nodshilder Joseph Odson; inscribed on January 10, 1885 at Springwater, Iowa
  • Samuel Odson; inscribed in 1885 at Springwater, Iowa
  • Rachel Odson; inscribed at Springwater, Iowa, on January 10, 1885
  • Albert A. Olson of Springwater, Iowa
  • Petra Pedersen; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on December 31, 1883 [not sure last digit]. Presumably written in Danish
  • Dora Puntney; inscribed on June 23, 1886
  • Joseph Richards of York, Minnesota; inscribed on February 15, 1886
  • Betsey C. Rierson of Mona, Iowa; inscribed on March 12, 1885 at Decorah Institute
  • Charles Sallee; inscribed on January 17, 1884 at Decorah, Iowa
  • Mrs. Sallee; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on August 1, 1884
  • Dixie Sallee of Decorah, Iowa
  • Carrie Sallee; from or inscribed at Royal, Nebraska, on February 16, 1889
  • Johanna Schmidt of B?, Howard County, Iowa; inscribed at Decorah Institute on October 30, 1885
  • Mrs. E. W. Scott of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on November 29 [the year is too faint to read]. Possibly Edith E. (Fawcett) Scott, who married Edward W. Scott on 11 May 1886. Edward may have been the E. W. Scott who inscribed a page elsewhere in the album. 
  • E. W. Scott of Decorah, Iowa; inscribed on October 29, 1886. Presumably the Edward W. Scott who married Edith E. Fawcett on 11 May 1886. Edith was presumably the Mrs. E. W. Scott who inscribed a page elsewhere in the album.
  • Margaret L. Scott; inscribed on October 16, 1886
  • Sever Severson, age 12, of Spring Water, Iowa; inscribed in 1886. Sever "John" Severson (1874-1955)
  • Helen Severson; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on December 20, 188?
  • Belle Shulze
  • Carrie Thompson of Springwater, Iowa; inscribed on November 17, 1885
  • F. B. Tillotson; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on January 8, 1884. Ida's teacher. Presumably Fred Burr Tillotson (1860-1937)
  • Edith Tuttle of St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin; inscribed on December 10, 1884 ?
  • Gacie Tuttle, age ?, 1887. Possibly "Lillie Gracie Tuttle" or "little" Gracie Tuttle; age could be five. Alternatively, the year could be 1897
  • Mary Weymouth
  • Ada Whiteman; inscribed at Decorah, Iowa, on October 13, 1883. Possibly the Ada S. Whiteman who married John J. Headington on 1 December 1886 at Decorah, Iowa.
  • Vinnie Whiteman
  • Clara Wilson or Wilsons

Sunday, August 8, 2021

1834, Eastport, Maine - Memorial of Inhabitants of Eastport, Maine re: Currency; 97 Names

1834 U.S. Government publication containing a request signed by 97 inhabitants, presumably merchants and professionals, of Eastport, Maine.  


Memorial of Inhabitants of Eastport, Maine, In Relation to the Currency
March 17, 1834
Referred to the Committee of Ways and Means

To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assembled:
Your memorialists, inhabitants of Eastport, Maine.

The names, shown below, are not recorded in alphabetical order, but a list in alphabetical order follows the image.
Names in Alphabetical Order - Note: There's at least one error in surnames, if not more - check the entire list if you are searching for someone you think should be here

AIsrael D. AndrewsHDavid HatchRIsaac Ray
James H. AndrewsThomas HaycockE. Richardson
BEd. BakerAaron HaydenBartlett Robbins
Stephen BartletCharles H. HaydenSE. Y. Sabine
Henry BatesPaoli HenryF. M. Sabine
Winslow BatesWilliam HerringtonLorenzo Sabine
J. BeechA. HillW. A. Sabine
John BeekfordJohn HinkleyJ. C. Shaw
John L. BowmanJoshua HinkleyLeonard Shaw
Stephen BoardmanFred HobbsJohn Shun
Anthony BrooksGeorge HobbsR. Smith
C. A. BrooksJ. HobbsWilliam H. C. Stearns
Charles BrooksJoseph HoneAbel Stevens
Nathan BucknamPartmon HoughtonSamuel Stevens
Seward BucknorWilliam HumeJohn L. Storer
Edward H. BurginRobert HurtonTS. Tinkham
John BurginJames HusonWSamuel B. Wadsworth
John Burgin, Jr.IEdward IlsleyRobert Walton
Thomas BurnhamKDaniel KilbyW. B. Warriner
CEdward CapenDaniel KnoxJohn Webster
George E. CardLJoseph LivermoreWilliam N. Weston
Jacob ClarkO. S. LivermoreSamuel Wetherell
Thomas ColesworthMJohn Mason
DJames C. DanaWilliam Matthes
Daniel DrewG. William McLellan, per W. B. W.
Francis H. DrewElias Merrill
John C. DutchE. B. Morgon
FHiram S. Favor, rather than PavorNJohn Norton
George W. FolsomEnoch Z. Noyes
GN. T. FosdickJoseph C. Noyes
Stephen F. GalePZ. A. Paine
Jesse GleasonThomas Parker
Jonas GleasonH. S. Pavor - more likely Hiram S. Favor
John GogginsGeorge A. Peabody
Daniel D. GrangerDarius Pearce
Elijah D. GreenJohn R. Phelan
Joseph GunnisonJohn Pike
W. Gustis
Jacob Gutterson

Transcript:

Respectfully Represent:
That they are extensively engaged in the business of foreign and domestic trade, in the fisheries, in the manufacture of iron and salt, in shipbuilding, and in the mechanic arts; that, for the last seven years, they have been prosperous, beyond former example, in their various pursuits, until the close of the last season; that their proximity to the British provinces has afforded facilities for trade which few places enjoy in an equal degree, and this circumstance, among others, has necessarily caused their business to be very much extended. Their trade in bread-stuffs, American manufactures, and provisions, alone, may be estimated at one million of dollars per annum, for which they receive in return the produce of the provinces and British exchange to a large amount.
Such was their condition, when, from causes unforeseen and unlooked for, they suddenly find their affairs deranged, the current of foreign and domestic exchange turned back upon them, confidence destroyed, their properly exposed to sacrifice, and themselves threatened with bankruptcy. 
Of the several principal houses in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, who have done the business of our merchants, five have failed within two months, and they uniformly attribute their failures to the derangement of the currency consequent upon the unfriendly relation subsisting between the Executive and the Bank of the United States. But, whatever may be the cause of the present alarming and ruinous conditions of the country, your petitioners appeal to Congress for relief, and respectfully, but earnestly, request that no personal or party considerations may be permitted to outweigh the grave duty which Senators and Representatives owe to their constituents and their country.
EASTPORT, February 22, 1834