Monday, November 30, 2020

1833 Letter from Fred Hobbs at Eastport, Maine, to Aaron L. Raymond, Esq., at Machias, Maine - list of Cases with Names

1833 Letter from attorney Frederick Hobbs at Eastport, Maine, to Aaron L. Raymond, Esq., Clerk of the Judicial Courts of Washington County, at Machias, Maine - containing a list of proposed cases, with many names.


A. L. Raymond              Eastport, Maine Mar. 2 1833
Sir:
Herewith you have my list of actions, as at present as actioned, for Entry. I may have occasion to move for the Entry of others & for mis Entry of some of these. I shall be at Machias as soon as "wind or weather" will permit.
                                      Yours truly
                                       Fred Hobbs

  • 155  Frederick Hobbs v Timothy Pilsbury
  • 156  George Savary v Same
  • 157  Cadwallader Curry vs. Abraham Loomer
  • 158  Cadwallader Curry vs. Jacob Crosby, Jr.
  • 159  Francis Martin v. John Delesdernier
  • 160 Jonathan Knight v. William Chaloner
  • 161  John Christie v. Abraham Loomer etal
  • 162  William Greene v Cadwallader Curry & Joseph Whelpley, Trustee
  • 163  Charles Brockway v. George W. Gilmore
  • 164  Daniel K. Chase or Chace v. Lydia Rich
  • 165  Daniel K. Chase or Chace v. Ahira Calkins
  • 166  Daniel K. Chase or Chace v. Micajah Hacoks
  • 167  John Wilson v. John A. Greenlaw & Trustees John Sprague & Daniel B. Crocker
  • 168  John Chickering v. William B. Hatch
  • 169  Samuel Rich v. Appleton Webb
  • 170  Elizabeth Child, Adm. v. Appleton Webb
  • 171  Elizabeth Child, Adm. v. James Shaw
  • 172  Stephen Babcock v. Ichabod Bucknam
  • 173  Jesse Gleason et al v. Jonas P. Lee



  • 174  Jesse Gleason et al v. Gideon Stetson
  • 175  James Douglas v. David Pottle et al
  • 176  James Douglas v. Azariah Pottle
  • 177  James Douglas v. Benajah Johnson
  • 178  John Milliken v. Benjamin Snow
  • 179  William Harris v. Benjamin Snow et al
  • 180  Abel Stevens v. Jesse Olmstead

If I was able to find a FindaGrave memorial for any of the people below, I linked it to their names. Thanks to dedicated volunteers, some of these memorials contain far more information than mere dates. 

If readers have corrections and/or have insights on any of the people mentioned here, please leave a comment or contact me directly, so I can update the list.

Those Named - Note: some may have lived in neighboring New Brunswick, Canada

Sunday, November 29, 2020

Civil War Document Detailing Clothing Allowances to George W. Fleck of Company D, 190th Pennsylvania

 

Civil War document detailing the clothing issued to George W. Fleck of Company D of the 190th Pennsylvania Regiment.

Presumably George Washington Fleck (1845-1876).  According to this form, George mustered in to Company D at Bull Run, Virginia, on 13 March 1864. 

The document, too large for one scan, is approximately 15-1/2" by 10-1/4". George signed for each distribution, with a witness for each.  Witnesses:

The document was signed at the bottom by William B. Duddy, Lieutenant. He was William B. Duddy (abt 1839-1913).

Note: The reverse of this form contains information on the clothing allowance of George Fisher, who is the subject of another post.

If you have more information on any of the men mentioned above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Civil War Document Detailing Clothing Allowances to George Fisher of Company D, 190th Pennsylvania

Civil War document detailing the clothing issued to George Fisher of Company D of the 190th Pennsylvania Regiment.

The document, too large for one scan, is approximately 15-1/2" by 10-1/4". George signed for each distribution, with a witness for each.  Witnesses:

 The document was signed at the bottom by William B. Duddy, Lieutenant. He was William B. Duddy (abt 1839-1913).


According to this form, George mustered in this Company at Bristoe, Virginia, on 1 February 1864. His record of service in Pennsylvania, Register of Military Volunteers, 1861-1865 notes that he was born about 1843 and that he was a paroled prisoner who mustered out with his Company on 28 June 1865.  He may have been the George Fisher who had mustered in as a private and mustered out as a corporal.

Note:  The reverse of this form contains information on the clothing allowance of Private George W. Fleck, who is the subject of another post.

If you have more information on any of the men mentioned above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Saturday, November 28, 2020

1835 Starks, Maine - Highway Tax Assessment by Elijah Waugh naming 13 Men, signed by 2 Additional Assessors.

 

A document describing the Highway taxes assessed to 13 residents of Starks, Maine, presented to Surveyor Elijah Waugh by Assessors James Varnum, Stephen Greenleaf and Stephen Williamson

The document measures just shy of 12" by 8".

See another document where Elijah Waugh was the defendant in 1836 against a complaint of trespass lodged by James Varnum. Waugh was ordered to appear at the dwelling-house in Norredgewock, Maine, of William Allen, Jr., Justice of the Peace.


The tax could be abated by the men's labor on the highway, with the value of their labor and that of any oxen, plows and carts spelled out in the document.

The 13 residents, not in alphabetical order.
Assessors


If you have information on any of the men listed above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Friday, November 27, 2020

"Poems" by Felicia Hemans: given to Maria F. Page by Netie P. Nealley in 1856; possibly Maria Frances Page (abt 1846-1906) and Henrietta Prince Nealley (1844-1926) of Bath, Maine

Small book entitled "Poems of Felicia Hemans" given to Maria F. Page by Netie P. Nealley in 1856. 

They were possibly Maria Frances Page (1846-1906) and Henrietta Prince Nealley (1844-1926), "Nettie", of Bath, Maine.  Maria, daughter of Albert G. page and Louisa (Drummond) Page, presumably never married. Nettie, daughter of Edward St. John Nealley and Lucy Colfax (Prince) Nealley, married Rev. John Gregson in 1875.

If these two, they must have been very literate for their ages.



The book measures approximately 5" by 3-1/4" and has 288 pages, with the poems and an essay on Heman's genius by H. T. Tuckerman. The book was edited by Rufus W. Griswold and printed by Leavitt & Allen in New York.  There's an engraving by Illman & Sons on the page facing the title page.



I riffled through quickly and didn't notice any missing pages, but did not go through page by page.  However, I did notice a reader's notations, perhaps those of Maria herself, on the poem Ivan the Czar.



Interestingly, the lines about the firstborn child apparently applied to Maria Frances Page herself; the firstborn of her parents, Albert G. Page and Mary Louise (Drummond) Page.

If you have a theory as to the identities of Mary F. Page and "Netie" P. Nealley, especially if other than the Maria and Henrietta posited above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.



1916/1917 Year Book of the Woman's M.P.M. Club of Brewer, Maine; Names of Members since founding in 1894, including those Deceased

 

1916/1917 Year Book of the Woman's M.P.M. Club in Brewer, Maine; organized in 1894, and containing names of current and former members, including those deceased since the founding.

If you know the unabbreviated name of the organization, please leave a comment - thanks.

The title page has the same wording as the front cover.


Officers for the present term
President - Miss Alice M. Farrington
Vice President - Mrs. Josephine J. Curtis
Secretary and Treasurer - Miss Jennie L. Farrington
Critic - Mrs. Clara A. Harlow

Programme Committee
Mrs. Emma A. Burr
Mrs. Emma F. Currier
Mrs. Josephine L. Curtis
Miss Jennie L. Farrington

Topics
Animals of Maine - Mrs. Cary
Mississippi River - Mrs. McMahon
The Stranger Within Our Gates - Mrs. Hall
Present Day Uses of Electricity - Mrs. Lou S. Harlow


Women and the War - Mrs. Kenney
Lecture on Browning - Mrs. J. A. Thompson
How the World is Fed - Mrs. Brown
Philanthropy - Mrs. Clara A. Harlow
A Winter in Florida - Mrs. Thomas


Municipal Civics - Mrs. Mary A. Burr
Early History of South America, Brazil - Miss Holmes
Argentina - Mrs. Woodbury


Paraguay and Uruguay - Mrs. Holyoke
Chili [sic] - Fauna and Flora of South America - Mrs. Croxford
Bolivia, the Guianas, Christmas in Latin America - Mrs. Swett
Past, Present and Future Relations between the United States and South America - Mrs. Laura N. Floyd
An Afternoon with Kipling - Miss Alice M. Farrington
Current Literature of the Day - Mrs. Cousins
An Afternoon with Shubert - Mrs. Gardiner
Present Day Problems and their Solutions - Mrs. Farrington


Current Events - Miss Fling
William Wordsworth - Mrs. Margaret Floyd

Roll of Members
Mrs. Effie M. Brown
Mrs. Emma A. Burr
Mrs. Mary A. Burr
Mrs. Kate G. Cary
Mrs. Ella M. Cousins
Mrs. Flora M. Croxford
Mrs. Emma F. Currier
Mrs. Josephine J. Curtis
Mrs. Sarah B. Farrington
Miss Alice M. Farrington
Miss Jennie L. Farrington
Miss Mary F. Fling
Mrs. Laura N. Floyd
Mrs. Margaret G. Floyd
Mrs. Catherine R. Gardiner
Mrs. Addie A. Hall
Mrs. Clara A. Harlow
Mrs. Lou S. Harlow
Miss Annie B. Holmes
Mrs. Annette L. Holyoke
Mrs. Fannie E. Kenney
Mrs. Agnes L. McMahon
Mrs. Lydia B. Swett
Mrs. Mary E. Thomas
Mrs. E. Estelle Woodbury

Associate Members
Mrs. Mertie M. Curtis
Mrs. Fannie H. Eckstorm
Mrs. Laura J. Holmes
Mrs. Susan M. Hook
Mrs. Kate Hutchings
Mrs. Hattie C. Royal

Honorary Members
Mrs. Mary Agnes Merrill
Mrs. Emma F. Hardy
Mrs. Grace S. B. Morse


In Memoriam
'99  Miss Clara E. Farrington
'99  Miss Jane H. Farrington
'01  Mrs. Jane M. Holyoke
'06  Mrs. Ada M. Crocker
'07  Mrs. Lizzie S. Tefft
'11  Mrs. Alma M. Gordon
'13  Mrs. Anne B. Holbrook
'15  Mrs. Mary E. Gilman
'16  Miss Lucy P. Fling
'18  Mrs. Mary G. Barker 



If you have information on any of these women, or if you know what M.P.M. stands for, please leave a comment or contact me directly.


Thursday, November 26, 2020

1839 [or 1859] Letter from Sarah at Waterford, possibly Connecticut or Maine, to Miss Temperance Miller at New Lyme, Ohio

1839 [or 1859] letter from Cousin Sarah in Waterford, presumably in Connecticut, but possibly in Maine, to Miss Temperance C. Miller, or Temperance P. Miller, in New Lyme, Ohio.  

Sarah is eager to hear from Temperance and even more eager to have her visit, especially with "Rollin", in whom Sarah has a romantic interest and worries about the cessation of his letters.  ...if he goes to Maine this spring he must set out very soon & if you accompany him I may soon expect to see you... Temperance, let your next letter be a long one & write as I once told you, all you think, all you feel & all you know that you think would interest your Cousin far away.

New Lyme, Ohio, was settled by people from Lyme, Connecticut, not far from Waterford, Connecticut. Among the settlers were George Miller and his wife Temperance (Chadwick) Miller. The name Temperance appeared in successive generations.  Sarah was presumably a cousin back home in Conneticut, or possibly Maine.




If you have information on the identities of Miss Temperance C. or P. Miller, then at New Lyme, Ohio, and her cousin Sarah, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Transcription - bound to be errors; please advise corrections!

Waterford April 20, 1839 [or 1859]
Dear Temperance
When I received the post the many pleasures & trying scenes; through an ___ Providence has cotinued an unworthy recipient of divine favors, I am often led to exclaim, Why is it thus? Sometimes I feel disposed to murmur & at others my spirit freely acquiesces, with whatever is my lot. But these happy moments are of short duration to produce my salutary effect upon my natural disposition. For if but one thought of Dear absent friends pervades my heart, almost every other object is forgotten. Why must it be so? Life is very short & even this short space must pass to oblivion. I still am not permitted to enjoy the society of dear affectionate friends, as we are journeying through "its steep ascent or flowery slope", toward the silent tomb.
Were it not for the sweet hope, beyond the reach of earthly connections, that I sometimes indulge, of meeting them to dwell forever in one eternal spring & never never more to part. How would every object be clothed in one perpetual gloom & the joyful prospect that I now anticipate. Would gloom & the joyful prospect that I now anticipate, would present only a scene of deep & dark despair. I have often thought even were the Infidel sentiments time. How much more happiness profess # the Infidel would enjoy, and I he but indulge the hope of a blessed immortality & Everlasting life beyond the grave.
My Dear Cousin, I do expect to see you this summer in Waterford, I do expect if you ever visit us it will be this season. Now do not disappoint your friends by becoming a missionary first; for then you will perhaps think you have more important business to attend too.  Neither shall I consent (perhaps you will not care for that) to you becoming an assistant clerk, for you know then you must attend to your customers - & if you become a farmers Lady you must stay in the kitchen to oversee the dairy, feed the cats & try to please honey. as well as you Can - (I s'pose I should try to do so, too, if I was thus situated). But you must make them all wait, until have you spent one year with Sarah & at the expiration of that time, if you feel disposed to listen to their solicitations, I shall consider my demands at an end. The season of youth is the best time to travel, the best time to visit. & a state of single blessedness the best; to enjoy life & happiness, so says nearly every Married lady; that I ever heard give her opinion on the subject & many of them have done it gratis. Temperance, when you Come, bring the little ___ [horse ?] you spoke of & put in all letters you have a similar nature, for you know it could not do my mischief & it might afford much pleasure. - 
You say Old Rollin sometimes speaks of me. I am pleased to hear, that I still retain a place in his memory. I hope in his prayers. I have many times hoped he would take the trouble to write to me, but it seems he never has. If he should even be, Cousin, I should then consider. I had a great Claim upon him, or in other words a right to expect he would occasionally write if no more than perhaps a little in your letters - if he goes to Maine this spring he must set out very soon & if you accompany him I may soon expect to see you. Temperance, let your next letter be a long one & write as I once told you, all you think, all you feel & all you know that you think would interest your Cousin far away. That is I mean everything that concerns yourself. I hope to hear from you soon & to see you in a few months at longest.  ___ may heaven's blessings attend you forever & when you come to a throne of Grace for yourself, remember your unworthy Cousin - with sincere affection, Sarah.

Bible of James Monroe Morrow (1815-1855) and Hannah Ann (Foster) Morrow (1818-1850) of Warren County, Ohio


One of their sons, Jeremiah Thomas Morrow (1844-1864), "Jerrie", apparently died at Andersonville Prison but if they ever got confirmation of that, they didn't update the death entry.

The thickness of this little Bible made it very difficult to photograph the pages - some information near the spine is blurred out in the images, but is readable in the Bible itself.

The Bible, which measures 6" by 3-1/2" by 1-1/4", has pages entitled Marriages, Births (two pages) and Deaths and also a handwritten note attesting to the fact that the Bible was passed on by Hannah on her death bed to her son Henry F. Morrow (1840-1867) on May 10, 1850.


Also included are two pages of handwriting, rather faint, one that appears to have been inscribed by a Cousin and the other, perhaps a continuation of the previous page, inscribed by Rebecca A. Griffiths at Griffith's Retreat in March 1839.


Marriages

  • James M. Morrow and Hannah Ann Foster were Married July 2, 1839
  • Rev. John R. Sanson and Emma R. Morrow were married at A. P. Shepherd's, near Muscadine [Muscatine], Iowa, by Rev. M. G. Cass - Oct 7 1868 - 10. A.M.
Births, two pages
First page

Second page


Deaths

Deaths, taken with phone to try to get deeper into the crease



If you have information on the Morrow and Foster families of Warren County, Ohio, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

No comments:

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Mary E. Starr, 1818; her book "The American Preceptor"; possibly Mary E. (Starr) Whiting (1799-1863)

The American Preceptor, Being a New Selection of Lessons for Reading and Speaking, Designed for the Use of Schools, by Caleb Bingham, A.M., printed in New York by B. & J. Collins for C. Bingham, 1815.

The owner's name on the second end paper: Mary E. Starr, November 1st 1818
The title page, shown below, indicates that this book was printed in New York by B. & J. Collins for author Caleb Bingham.  The book measures approximately 6-1/2" by 4-1/4" and contains 228 numbered pages. It appears that a few pages are missing between the Contents and the next page, which is numbered 9.


Contents, shown in the two images below:  this book would have been geared toward the older student. 



Interestingly, there were several women in Connecticut named Mary E. Starr, including one who was born 3 February 1799 in New London, Connecticut, daughter of Joshua and Lucy Starr. Joshua and Lucy were presumably the Joshua Starr, Jr. and Lucy Colfax who married in Hartford, Connecticut, on 25 April 1798.

This Mary E. Starr (1799-1863), who would marry William Loring Whiting (1795-1850) in 1820, would have been a suitable age in 1818 to have this as a lesson book.  

The Whiting family appears to have moved to Canada, where some of their children were born, and then to Chicago, Illinois, where William was involved with the Whiting, Magil & Company, "forwarding and commission merchants". According to an encyclopedia entry on their youngest daughter Alice Harvey (Whiting) Putnam (1841-1919), William founded the Chicago Board of Trade. Loring Street in Chicago is named after William L. Whiting.


If you have another theory as to the identity of Mary E. Starr, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

1880-1881 Autograph Album of Lura L. Talbot of East Wilton, Maine

 

1880-1881 autograph album that belonged to Lura L. Talbot of East Wilton, Maine. 

The album measures approximately 5-1/4" by 3-1/4" and contains the sentiments of 34 of Lura's relatives, friends, schoolmates and teachers.  An alphabetical list of the inscribers, together with any personal information they offered, appears at the end of this post.

Surnames in the Album

AAdams [3[FFarnum [2]NNelke
AllenFrenchPPease
BBassGGreenePhinney
Bowley [2]HHammondSSewall
BrownHinckleyTTalbot [2]
ButterfieldHoweTownsend [2]
CChaney [2]LLittlefieldWWellman [2]
ChaseMMairs
ConnerMarston
CurrierMurch

From brief online research, hopefully correct - corrections and additions requested:

Lura Linn Talbot (1865-1919) was born 26 October 1865 at Wilton, Maine, the daughter of Charles Johnson Talbot (1826-1884) and Almira Ann (Colby) Smith Talbot (1831-1898).  Lura's older half-brother, Archie Lee Talbot (1846-1932) inscribed a page in her album on March 20, 1880 at Lewiston, Maine.


Also inscribing a page in the album was Jennie Farnum (1865-1887), sister of Lura's future husband, Edwin Stanton Farnum (1862-1925).


Lura and Edwin married on 26 November 1891 at Wilton, Maine, where they would raise their family of several children. After Lura's death in 1919, Edwin married Edith Lowell in 1925, shortly before his death.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above or information about any of the people mentioned below, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Alphabetical List of Inscribers