Thursday, December 31, 2015

October 1917 or 1918 Letters from Ann (Potter) Kelser of Oldham, England, to Ida Ellan Hall (Ogden) Flint in Massachusetts; War-related


October 20 and October 29 letters from either 1917 or 1918, written by, I believe, Ann (Potter) Kelser, "Nan", of 4 Staveley Place, Salem, Oldham, Lancashire, England, to Ida, who I believe to have been Nan's half-sister Ida Ellen Hall (Ogden) Flint in the Boston, Massachusetts area.

Images of the letters and a transcription of each appear at the end of this post.  Click on any image to enlarge it.

The letters mention the recuperation of Nan's husband Alexander Kelser, "Alec", at Easton Park in Easton, Suffolk, England, the estate of the Duchess Mary Hamilton, which sadly no longer exists.  For a history of Easton Park, click here and scroll down to the section on the Hamilton family.  Nan also expressed her admiration for President Wilson and his "Sammies".

From brief online research, which did not leave definitive information - corrections and additions would definitely be appreciated:

Ann (Potter) Kelser, "Nan", was born about 1886 in Chadderton, Lancashire, England.  According to a record of her baptism on August 26, 1886 at St. John and St. Matthew at Chadderton, she was the daughter of Jesse Potter and Mary Ellen Potter, perhaps Mary Ellen (Simpson) Potter, whose first husband Seville [or Saville or Sayville] Ogden had died in 1882.  On April 15, 1906 at Oldham, Lancashire, England, Nan married Alexander Kelser, "Alec".  I don't have information on his parents.  Nan and Alec lived at 4 Staveley Place, Salem, Oldham, Lancashire, England, and had two children, Annie Kelser and Frank Kelser, who figure in the letters.

Ida Ellen Hall (Ogden) Flint was born December 3, 1883, daughter, according to her marriage record, of Seville [or Saville or Sayville] Ogden and Mary Ellen (Simpson) Ogden. I found a Saville Ogden who died in 1882, which is a problem.  About 1895, Ida came to the United States, but I don't know if she came on one visit or more.  On September 23, 1905 at Newton, Massachusetts, Ida married Ernest Melville Flint, son of Edgar L. Flint and Alice May (Ames) Flint.  Ernest was born at Damariscotta, Maine, on October 8, 1882.  Ida and Ernest lived at Needham, Massachusetts, and Boston, Massachusetts, and had sons Clarence Melville Flint and Ogden William Flint, who are mentioned in the letters.

If you have corrections, clarifications or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Images of the Letters










Transcript:

4 Staveley Place
Salem Oldham, Lancashire, England
October 20

My Dear Sister,

You will be pleased to know Alec is in England.  He has been in Hospital down in Suffolk, down in the South of England, and whilst he was there, Annie and I went to see him and stayed in the same Village for two weeks.   Alec was staying in the home of Her Grace the Duchess of Hamilton.  So, miss, you see we have been amongst the Aristocracy.  Annie and I stayed a few yards from the Mansion which is called Easton Hall.   The Hall itself is a beautiful house, or rather I should say Mansion, for it is of a tremendous size and the beautiful old English oak paneling and furniture is a sight of beauty never to be forgotten.   I remember once hearing a song about the Stately Homes of England.   Well I've seen two of the grandest Halls in England and I think the grounds of Hamilton or Easton Park are just lovely  for whilst we were there all the fruit was at its best.  Didn't take me long to get friendly with the Head Gardener.   Peaches, plums, apples, grapes, in fact all fruits and nuts, vegetables, etc, of every description.   To be sure I got some peaches and I had the satisfaction of knowing they were of the finest quality grown.   Ida, I do wish you could have two weeks on the Hamilton Estate as I had.   Words fail to express the treat we had.  Her Grace belongs to all and everything she can see around her as she rides along the country roads, miles upon miles of lovely country, corn fields, orchards, farms, woods, etc., all belong to Lady Mary Hamilton really, Lady Mary  Hamilton is the only Daughter of the Duchess of Hamilton.  Lady Mary married Lord Grahme.   They have three children and live at the present time at their country home up in Scotland. The Duchess has been married twice, her first husband being the Duke of Hamilton and Lady Mary's father.  He left the Estate, Park and Grounds to Lady Mary and left his wife a beautiful house and farm, also the means to uphold her title for life.   She after a time married a Mr. Foster, a regular scamp he turned out to be,  and they have not lived together for years. The Duchess is running the Mansion as a Red Cross Hospital for Wounded Soldiers and lives there also. It really is Lady Mary's home but I guess Mother and Daughter understand each other and Lady Mary has two or three beautiful Halls in Scotland.  Her husband is a very wealthy Lord, and both he and his wife are beloved by the tenants on the Estate but the Duchess is not liked so well.  So you see, Ida, Annie, Alec and I have danced in one of the “Stately Homes of England”.  The ballroom is very nice and the Duchess played for dancing.  The nurses and soldiers and the Select villagers were there.  So Annie and I had a rare time.  Annie danced all except one dance.  I had every dance.  Alex cannot dance. The Duchess came and spoke to me and then to Annie. So you see, dear,  we've been among the Knuts, eh!   Alec is better now and is having 10 days sick leave, then off to France again, I expect.  It's hard to have him go out a fourth time but he's been very lucky not to be killed before this, for he has been in the thick of the fighting and was in the Great Retreat last March when the Huns broke through.  His company was Sacrifice Party and the Germans beckoned  them to surrender, but they fought on and covered their retreat as best they could. The Royal Engineers were ready to blow up the bridge when they got down to Perrone and they were only just in time to get across.  Ida, I have plenty of pluck but when Alex tells me what they have had to go through it makes me sit quick and hold his hand. I must not let him see me cry but, oh, don't I feel like going out, to do my bit in France. I am more proud of my nationality now than ever I was British - Yes - to the backbone.  However,  2 days of the precious ten have gone.   I shut my eyes here and try not to think, shut my left fist tight and wonder shall I have strength to take my  part as he takes his.   I must, though, & I will not give in. One must set their back and square their chin and be determined.  It's the Huns who give the women the courage to face their troubles.  The Huns who thought to terrify us by the barbarous methods of War and the very thing they used to frighten us gives us courage.  Now, dear, I have two gifts from two of your Yankee Soldiers.  One is a button, a soldier's button. One is a silver half Dollar. Their train drew up alongside ours at a station on the Kettering line. The tram was crowded with President Wilson's Boys and the yell they gave made my heart leap with joy. They opened the carriage windows and I opened my carriage window. They wanted newspapers and I and some of my fellow travelers were able to oblige them. One fine fellow asked me if I would like a souvenir. I said I didn't mind as I had been to America and my sister was there married. That did it. The fellows in that carriage seemed to go crazy.  One happy lad pulled a bundle of dollars out of his pocket and offered me some to buy the little girl something fine.  I thanked him and told him to keep his dollars as he would need them in England and more so in France, for the prices, oh Ida,  they are awful. I have to work although I feel like dropping at times, but the allowance is so very small I dare not tell you how things are here. Don't think I am complaining, dear, no, no I don't mean anything like that for all soldiers’ wives here are the same. But the war will soon be over. Well I had to take a coin as a keepsake off a Sammie and so we changed coins.  Bet your nibs I'd have to be jolly hungry before I parted with that half dollar and the button. Well I prize the button all the more because the soldier saluted me and Annie. The train started to move out and didn't those boys cheer.  Well, you ought to have heard them. Good luck and Godspeed was my unspoken thought and my eyes were dim.  They were going to embark for France not knowing what the hell it is.  They were ready for the fray and I hope they may soon be coming home to the land they lived in, The Land of Liberty.

That's the name I think of it by now, not America but the Land of Liberty.  Des not the Statue signify it?  Well, sweetheart, I've tried to write to you a letter.   I'm afraid it's a poor letter though, for all the time I keep thinking two days gone. But then, what's the use of worrying?  Worry killed the cat and seeing what a cattish nature I have, I must be careful, else I may suffer a similar fate. And I want to live to see the Day President Wilson comes into his own.

You have no idea how we British people look to President Wilson and All his Huskies. It’s to be hoped he is properly appreciated when his Day comes.  He's a fine fellow in my way of thinking. May he live long and die happy is my wish. Your boys are doing good work in France, dear, and we are proud of them. There, 90 pounder Phoebe, does that suit you?  Well, Ida, I think this is all. Excuse me this time. I cannot write as I would like. Give my love to Ma, Flint, Uncle Frank, Ernest, Clarence, Ogden, Edgar and accept the same for yourself from your loving and happy Sister Nan.

How is Henry's family? Do let me know. Love to them all, also Nettie and family, also Aunt Ellen and Pollie Heald  and her children. What's become of Mary and John Heald? I still cherish the pretty Bon Bon dish she gave me.  Yes and love to Georgie but don't tell her I sent it.  But she's your chum and I’ve a chum I love just as dearly as you love Georgie.

X X X X X X  and given me a kiss (bless him)

Staveley Place
Salem Oldham
Lancashire, England
October 29

My Darling Sister,
You owe me a letter. I know you haven't had time to answer my last one yet, but when I’ve posted this one off to you I can say Ida hasn't answered my last two letters yet.  How can you be so neglectful, cruel, woman?  Poor little Nan.   Poor child (Dear little innocent) to be neglected thus.   Nan who never did and never would refuse a good feed.  Don't let Ern read this letter, Ida, then I can say what I like to you.   The Censor man never seems to take offense  at what I write.   I guess it's because we both use the same swear words. I should swear heavy, though, if I had to wade through a lot of letters like some. The ninety pounder Phoebe,  well she writes just like you and who the devil can read so well, my hand absolutely refuses to try and write like you and the 90 pounder.  She had better take care and be more careful in her writing.  But you are even worse than Phoebe, you are.   You cannot write plainly. If you’re not bow legged, your writing is.  “Sorry, Censor”.   Phoebe, I guess, writes like you, walks like you,  dresses like you but I bet there's two things she cannot do like you, i.e. Talk and Cook like you.  You're a good cook and a better talker.  Ha Ha.  Go on, get mad and cuss away.  The Censor won’t mind.    He's a decent chap.   I know him quite well by this time.   Alec been home for 10 days sick leave and went back yesterday.  One feels sad and lonely today so took the best way out of my sadness by writing to my one and only sister. No, the fault is not mine, Ida. I would rather have been a brother but you will have to put up with me. I'm here and here I intend to remain as long as I can. It's a dear old world we live in and if the rain does pour down six days out of every seven, just think what a nice time we have on our fine days. It just rains, rains, rains all the time in Oldham.   I'm just as sleepy as I can be. I may finish this letter and I may not. The kettle, or rather the water in the kettle, is boiling and I want my tea.   I've got some precious jam for tea, the first we’ve had for 7 months and then Alec had to get it for me.  He says I've done nothing, only take him shopping, all the time he's been at home and says he wouldn't like to have me for a customer if he was a shopkeeper. I told him I would have a divorce and then he said, “but you're the best little wife any man could have” and so I smiled and we are good friends. So I wonder did he mean it. You can jolly well shut your face and stop laughing. You couldn't take him away from me with all your good look.  You're only a baby, you know. Ernest has spoiled you, you’re [mad, maid?]. You was a bit of a sport when you was a child at home, but now. Well you're a baby miss Matilda Gartside. If she's Tilly to you she's Tilly to me. I like her, she said my house was clean. Yes I like her she said you was so sheltered and happy.  Well, old girl, you deserve to be. You're a really good sister and even if you do scribble you cannot help it. So we will blame the pen. I think I like Phoebe but am not quite sure. Am waiting her next letter and then I can tell you what I think of her. But if she gets pitying me in any way, she's done. I write no more to her. You could do with just a wee bit more sympathy for me. You are not half as sympathetic as some folks. That's the reason I answer your letters so prompt. I like your chin wag, old girl. You go it, talk away, uphold family traditions. It's far better than being a dud. So chatter away.  Don't I wish I could see you.  We’d cheat the Censor chap, eh?   Well, Ida, my throat is on the better side just now. I am not working so maybe I shall be better. I hope so. How are you, Ida. Do you keep well and does Ern have good health? How are your boys. I'll bet they lead you a dance.   I’ve only one boy but he's full of the devil, not a bad lad, oh dear no, but he's a boy alright. Annie gets shocks now and again and you should see him tumble her about. I laugh till the tears roll down my cheeks.

Annie is very particular over her hair, clothes, etc Frank wouldn't care if he never saw soap and water for a month. His pockets are always full of tins, string, nails, knife, corks, etc.   He is a villain but just a lovable boy.  Dad is having his tea. He just looks the same. He still goes out with his papers and he is 79 next March.  I wonder what sort of an old geezer I should be at 79.  Talk about skull and crossbones. Oh bring some brandy. The Censor has fainted  and no wonder, poor chap. Well, Ida, I have not a lot of news.  Alec is at Grimsby just at present. But may have to go out to France any day. Remember me to Uncle Frank, Ernest, Clarence, Ogden, Edgar and all the rest.  I have written to Ma.

So dear Sister, good afternoon.   I'm going to have my tea.  XXXXXXXX from your loving Sister.
Happy Nan XXX


Tuesday, December 29, 2015

c1870s Highway Surveyor's Book for District #4, Town of Milbridge, Maine


c1870s Highway Surveyor's Book for District #4, Town of Milbridge, Maine.  Sadly, this particular surveyor did not leave his name or provide a date.   The first page of text provides a partial year, 187, so presumably the book was filled out in the 1870s or 1880s.

The booklet was printed by David Bugbee and Company, Stationer, of Bangor, Maine.


The booklet contains several pages listing residents and non residents, as well as the tax assessed on each.   An alphabetical surname list and an alphabetical full name list appear at the end of this post, as does a set of images of the entire booklet.





Surnames in the Booklet


BBrackettKKelleySSawyer [3]
Bray [2]LLeighton [8]Shaw [2]
CCampbell [3]MMartinSmall [3]
ColesonMcColmStevens [2]
CraigMcDonald [2]Strout
CummingsMooreSwanton
EEvansNNasonTTreat [2]
FFarnsworthPPerkinsTuttle
Fickett [4]PinkhamWWallace [2]
FriendRRayWass
GGay [2]Roberts [2]
HHinkley [2]
Huson

Names in the Booklet

B
  • Benjamin Brackett
  • John L. Bray
  • William Bray
C
  • Fletcher Campbell
  • Pat Campbell heirs
  • John Campbell
  • Warren Coleson
  • James C. Craig
  • W. A. Cummings
E
  • John Evans
F
  • P. S. Farnsworth heirs; possibly Peleg S. Farnsworth
  • Warren E. Fickett
  • Elias Fickett heirs
  • Moses Fickett, Non Resident
  • B. G. Fickett, Non Resident
  • Eldridge Friend, Non Resident
G
  • John M. Gay
  • Amos Gay
H
  • Nathan Hinkley, Non Resident
  • Albion Hinkey, Non Resident [crossed out]
  • E. L. Huson, Non Resident; possibly pump and block maker Edward L. Huson of Machiasport, Maine
K
  • George W. Kelley
L
  • Everett Leighton
  • David B. Leighton
  • James P. Leighton
  • Levi C. Leighton heirs
  • Lorenzo Leighton
  • Judson Leighton
  • Napoleon Leighton
  • James A. Leighton
M
  • Harry C. Martin
  • Isaac McColm
  • F. C. McDonald
  • F. H. McDonald, listed on a Resident page and a Non Resident page, but his name as a Non Resident is crossed out.
  • Ayer Moore and Company, Non Resident
N
  • John Nason
P
  • E. R. Perkins; possibly Elijah R. Perkins
  • Barnabas Pinkham, Non Resident
R
  • Luther Ray
  • S. J. Roberts; possibly Sylvester J. Roberts
  • Oscar Roberts
S
  • George S. Sawyer
  • W. R. Sawyer; possibly William R. Sawyer or Wellington R. Sawyer
  • Charles W. Sawyer
  • William Shaw
  • Charles Shaw heirs, Non Resident [crossed out]
  • Myrick R. Small
  • Stillman Small
  • Timothy Small
  • Thomas Stevens
  • Robert Stevens
  • Benjamin Strout
  • Joseph B. Swanton
T
  • Samuel L. Treat
  • Samuel Treat, Jr.
  • Isaac Tuttle
W
  • Charles E. Wallace heirs
  • Oscar Wallace
  • Mrs. Mary Wass
If you have information on any of the people mentioned in this booklet, please leave a comment or contact me directly.












1930 Photograph of the Bishop Sisters of Chester, Connecticut: Isabel Bishop; Marjorie Frances Bishop; Betty May Bishop


1930 Photograph of the Bishop Sisters of Chester, Connecticut.  Left to right:  Betty May Bishop; Marjorie Frances Bishop; Isabel Bishop.

Click on an image to enlarge it.




The sisters were the daughters of Oliver Raymond Bishop and Emma (Klein) Bishop.   The eldest, Isabel Bishop, was born November 11, 1811 in Connecticut.  I believe she married Howard Nelson Arnold.

Middle sister Marjorie Frances Bishop was born June 27, 1914 at Chester, Connecticut.  She died in 2003 and was still using her maiden name, so perhaps she never married.

Youngest sister Betty May Bishop was born September 25, 1921 at Meriden, Connecticut.  She married F. Clark Laurie, who became an officer at Utica College.  Betty May died in 2005 at Utica, New York.

I believe that Isabel and Marjorie attended Connecticut College; and Betty May attended Duke University at Durham, North Carolina.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Monday, December 28, 2015

1885 Photograph of either L. F. Bene or L. H. Lequin or L. H. Leguin; New York City studio


Spring 1885 photograph of a young man, taken by Frederick's Knickerbocker Family Portrait Gallery of 770 Broadway, Corner, Corner of 9th Street, New York, New York.

Two names appear on the reverse, one presumably the photograph recipient and one presumably the young man in the photograph:  L. F. Bene, who may have been Laurence F. Bene, and L. H. Lequin or L. H. Leguin.   Both of them, or just one, may have been a graduate of a high school or college in 1885.


I found a Lawrence F. Bene, or Lawrence F. Bene, born September 15, 1861 at Hoboken, New Jersey, son of Rehul T. Bene and wife Lizzie (?).   He may have been the same Laurence F. Bene who died at Fairview, New Jersey in 1899.  Additionally, I found a Lawrence F. Bene cited in a 1898 DAR publication noting the membership of his wife, Mrs. Linba Helen Dewey Bene, daughter of John Van Deusen Dewey and Cornelia H. (Miller) Dewey.  An L. F. Bene was shown as a private in the 7th Regiment of New York, in an 1886 Annual Report of the Adjutant-General.

As for L. H. Lequin or L. H. Leguin, I found a couple possibilities but hope that a reader will come through with an identification and a connection to L. F. Bene.

If you have insights into the two names on the reverse of this photograph, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Memorial to Frederick D. Stuart in 1878 I.O.O.F. Proceedings of the Annual Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island


Memorial page for Frederick D. Stuart, included in the 1878 Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Click on any image to enlarge it.


The booklet, which consists of about 67 pages, contains many names and has 5 other memorial pages, in page order:  [Please take all dates and places with a grain of salt, in case the informant was mistaken]
  • Horace Almy Manchester, born at Tiverton Four Corners, Rhode Island, in 1812; died at Stockton, California on April 30, 1877
  • Thomas Rodman Gardiner, born March 28, 1840 at Lime Rock, Rhode Island; died May 10, 1877 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Nathan Porter, born March 28, 1817 at Salem, Massachusetts; died January 6, 1878 at Sacramento, California
  • Francis Cusick, born August 7, 1822 at Omagh in the North of Ireland; died January 21, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Horatio Lewis Holmes, born October 24, 1815 at Lexington, Massachusetts; died January 9, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island

Text of the Memorial page dedicated to Frederick D. Stuart:

Frederick D. Stuart, 
P. G. Sire.
Born in Brooklyn, New York, July 12, 1814.
Exalted in Mount Pisgah Encampment, No. 3, 
Washington, D. C., August 19, 1845,
And at the Institution of Ridgley Encampment, No. 5, October 9, 1846, was Installed its first Chief Patriarch.
Admitted into the R. W. Grand Encampment, District Columbia, 
February 6, 1847
Elected and Installed R. W. Grand Patriarch,
August 10, 1852.
Admitted a Member of the R. W. G. Lodge of the United States,
from the Grand Encampment of the District of Columbia,
September 20, 1858.
Installed M. W. Grand Sire,
September 20, 1870
Died in the City of Washington, D. C., Jan. 25, 1878,
Aged 64 Years

From brief online research, hopefully correct:  [corrections and additions requested!]

According to the memorial page, Frederick D. Stuart was born at Brooklyn, New York, on July 12, 1814.  He is presumably the same Frederick D. Stuart who joined the U.S. Navy and was a member of the United States Exploring Expedition, under Charles Wilkes, as well as serving during Wilkes during the Civil War.  Stuart Island, off the coast of Washington, was named for Frederick D. Stuart.  About 1835, Frederick married Catherine Van Voorhis; they had several children, including Frederick D. Stuart, Jr., who also served in the U. S. Navy.  See a brief write-up on father and son here, in a walking-tour handout for the Congressional Cemetery Bicentennial Heritage Festival (1807-2007) at Washington, D. C.., they, and other family members, are buried.

Frederick D. Stuart, Sr., died at Washington, D. C. on January 25, 1878.  According to a Find-a-Grave listing, he had caught a chill at the funeral of his wife two weeks earlier.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Memorial to Horatio Lewis Holmes in 1878 I.O.O.F. Proceedings of the Annual Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island


Memorial page for Horatio Lewis Holmes, included in the 1878 Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Click on any image to enlarge it.


The booklet, which consists of about 67 pages, contains many names and has 5 other memorial pages, in page order:  [Please take all dates and places with a grain of salt, in case the informant was mistaken]
  • Horace Almy Manchester, born at Tiverton Four Corners, Rhode Island, in 1812; died at Stockton, California on April 30, 1877
  • Thomas Rodman Gardiner, born March 28, 1840 at Lime Rock, Rhode Island; died May 10, 1877 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Nathan Porter, born March 28, 1817 at Salem, Massachusetts; died January 6, 1878 at Sacramento, California
  • Francis Cusick, born August 7, 1822 at Omagh in the North of Ireland; died January 21, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Frederick D. Stuart, born July 12, 1814 at Brooklyn, New York; died January 25, 1878 at Washington, D.C.

Text of the Memorial page dedicated to Horatio Lewis Holmes:

Horatio Lewis Holmes,
P. H. P.
Born in Lexington, Mass., October 24, 1815.
Came to Providence, R. I. in 1835.
Exalted in Moshassuck Encampment, No. 2., 
February 5, 1846.
Installed M. E. High Priest of said Encampment, No. 2, 
July 18, 1850.
Admitted into the R. W. Grand Encampment of Rhode Island, 
January 31, 1853.
Died in the City of Providence, R. I., January 9, 1878.
Aged 63 Years.

From brief online research, hopefully correct:  [corrections and additions requested - found many inconsistencies and some of them repeated online]

According to the memorial page, Horatio Lewis Holmes was born October 24, 1815 at Lexington, Massachusetts.   A Massachusetts birth record confirms the date but places the birth at Kingston, Massachusetts and names Horatio's parents as Lewis Holmes and Sophia Holmes.  An entry on Ancestry.com, gives an incorrect birth year of 1813, which is readily cleared up by reading the referenced document itself.  I'm not sure if Horatio lived at Lexington, Massachusetts for a while, or if he had no connection with Lexington at all.

The Brewster Genealogy, by Emma C. Brewster Jones, includes a Horatio Lewis Jones with a birth date and place of October 24, 1815 at Kingston, Massachusetts, son of Lewis Holmes, Sr., and Sophia (Holmes) Holmes.  Unfortunately, Emma has poor Horatio as dying on February 5, 1842, the same death date as that of his first wife Mary Gladding Holmes, despite the fact that Emma also notes that Horatio married his second wife Nancy Hardenbeurg on November 25, 1845.   Horatio's death date of January 9, 1878 is correct, according to multiple sources.

Consequently, what I've determined is that Horatio Lewis Holmes was born at Kingston, Massachusetts, on October 24, 1815, the son of Lewis Holmes and Sophia (Holmes) Holmes.  According to the Brewster Genealogy, on September 30, 1840, Horatio married Mary Gladding of Providence, Rhode Island.  Mary died on February 5, 1842.  I don't know if Horatio and Mary had children or if Mary died in childbirth.  Also according to the Brewster Genealogy,  Horatio married Nancy Hardenbergh of Providence, Rhode Island, on November 25, 1845.  Horatio and Nancy had, I believe, at least two children, one of whom died in infancy.

According to an 1870 report of the Board of Water Commissioners of Providence, Horatio was hired at an annual salary of $1500 to inspect the city water pipes.  Horace and his brother-in-law Fayette Hardenbergh received a patent in 1877 for a top-roll support for spinning machines. 

Horatio and his two wives are buried at Swan Point Cemetery at Providence, Rhode Island.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.


Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Memorial to Francis Cusick in 1878 I.O.O.F. Proceedings of the Annual Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island


Memorial page for Francis Cusick, included in the 1878 Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Click on any image to enlarge it.


The booklet, which consists of about 67 pages, contains many names and has 5 other memorial pages, in page order:  [Please take all dates and places with a grain of salt, in case the informant was mistaken]
  • Horace Almy Manchester, born at Tiverton Four Corners, Rhode Island, in 1812; died at Stockton, California on April 30, 1877
  • Thomas Rodman Gardiner, born March 28, 1840 at Lime Rock, Rhode Island; died May 10, 1877 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Nathan Porter, born March 28, 1817 at Salem, Massachusetts; died January 6, 1878 at Sacramento, California
  • Horatio Lewis Holmes, born October 24, 1815 at Lexington, Massachusetts; died January 9, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Frederick D. Stuart, born July 12, 1814 at Brooklyn, New York; died January 25, 1878 at Washington, D.C.

Text of the Memorial page dedicated to Francis Cusick:  [Note: his naturalization record indicates his birth date as August 7, 1823]

Francis Cusick
P. H. P.
Born in Omagh, County of Tyrone, in the North of Ireland, August 7, 1822. 
Came to Providence in 1846
Exalted into Narragansett Encampment, No. 1,
October 9, 1868.
Installed as M. E. High Priest of said Encampment, No. 1,
January 21, 1871.
Admitted into the R. W. Grand Encampment of Rhode Island, 
July, 1871
Installed as M. E. Grand High Priest, 
March 7, 1877
Assumed the Duties of M. W. Grand Patriarch, 
May, 1877
Died in Providence, R. I., January 21, 1878,
Aged 56 Years.

From brief online research, hopefully correct:  [corrections and additions requested!]

Francis Cusick was born, according to his immigration record as August 7, 1823, and according to the information above, as August 7, 1822 at Omagh in what is now Northern Ireland.  I believe his parents were Francis Cusick and Anne (Higinson) Cusick.  

Francis Cusick, the subject of the memorial page, came to the U.S. by way of New York, on July 17, 1843 and, according to the memorial  page, was in Providence, Rhode Island, by 1846, where he worked as a machinist.  He was naturalized on March 18, 1856.

I haven't yet found a marriage record for Francis and Jane (?); nor do I know Jane's parents or birth place; she was born about 1816.  Francis and Jane had several children, three of whom are buried with them at North Burial Ground at Providence, Rhode Island.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.


Monday, December 21, 2015

Memorial to Nathan Porter in 1878 I.O.O.F. Proceedings of the Annual Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island


Memorial page for Nathan Porter, included in the 1878 Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Click on any image to enlarge it.


The booklet, which consists of about 67 pages, contains many names and has 5 other memorial pages, in page order:  [Please take all dates and places with a grain of salt, in case the informant was mistaken]
  • Horace Almy Manchester, born at Tiverton Four Corners, Rhode Island, in 1812; died at Stockton, California on April 30, 1877
  • Thomas Rodman Gardiner, born March 28, 1840 at Lime Rock, Rhode Island; died May 10, 1877 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Francis Cusick, born August 7, 1822 in Omagh, County of Tyrone, in the North of Ireland; died January 21, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Horatio Lewis Holmes, born October 24, 1815 at Lexington, Massachusetts; died January 9, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Frederick D. Stuart, born July 12, 1814 at Brooklyn, New York; died January 25, 1878 at Washington, D.C.

Text of the Memorial page dedicated to Nathan Porter:

Nathan Porter
P.G. Rep.
Born in Salem, Massachusetts, March 28, 1817.
Came to Providence, R.I., in 1841.
Exalted into Moshassuck Encampment No. 2, 
June 17, 1852
Joined Golden Gate Encampment, No. 1, San Francisco, Cal., 
September 10, 1859
Admitted a Member of the R. W. G. Encampment of California,
May 1, 1865.
Admitted a Member of the R. W. G. Lodge of the United States,
from the Grand Encampment of California,
September 19, 1870.
Died in the City of Sacramento, Cal., January 6, 1878
aged 61 Years

From brief online research, hopefully correct:  [corrections and additions requested!]

According to the birth date and place on the Memorial page, Nathan Porter was born at Salem, Massachusetts, on March 28, 1817.  I haven't determined the names of his parents.  About 1844 at Boston, Massachusetts, he married Sarah Ann Reed, daughter of sea captain and shipmaster Paul Maxwell Reed and wife Mary (Sparr or Speare) Reed.  Sarah Ann was born February 22, 1822, according to the History of the Reed Family, by J. W. Reed.  Nathan and Sarah would have three daughters, Sarah E. Porter; Clara B. Porter and Rena B. Porter.  

Nathan went to Rhode Island to study law and became an assemblyman in the Rhode Island General Assembly.  After the family moved to California, Nathan served as a district attorney for San Francisco County and in the California legislature, where he died in office on January 6, 1878.  

The publication "The Half Century of California Odd Fellowship, by George Henry Tinkham, published in 1906, includes a brief biography of Nathan Porter and his photograph.


See Nathan Porter's obituary in the Daily Alta California, Volume 30, Number 10133, dated January 7, 1878.  [Better to read the obituary itself than to try to make sense of the digitized text.]

If you have corrections and/or addition to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Memorial to Thomas Rodman Gardiner of Rhode Island in 1878 I.O.O.F. Proceedings of the Annual Right Worthy Encampment at Rhode Island


Memorial page for Thomas Rodman Gardiner, included in the 1878 Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Right Worthy Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Click on any image to enlarge it.


The booklet, which consists of about 67 pages, contains many names and has 5 other memorial pages, in page order:  [Please take all dates and places with a grain of salt, in case the informant was mistaken]
  • Horace Almy Manchester, born at Tiverton Four Corners, Rhode Island, in 1812; died at Stockton, California on April 30, 1877
  • Nathan Porter, born March 28, 1817 at Salem, Massachusetts; died January 6, 1878 at Sacramento, California
  • Francis Cusick, born August 7, 1822 in Omagh, County of Tyrone, in the North of Ireland; died January 21, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Horatio Lewis Holmes, born October 24, 1815 at Lexington, Massachusetts; died January 9, 1878 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • Frederick D. Stuart, born July 12, 1814 at Brooklyn, New York; died January 25, 1878 at Washington, D.C.

Text of the memorial page dedicated to Thomas Rodman Gardiner:

Thomas Rodman Gardiner,
P.G.P.
Born in Lime Rock, R.I., March 28, 1840
Exalted into Moshassuck Encampment, No. 2,
Thursday, March 24, 1870.
Installed Most Excellent High Priest,
Thursday, January 1873.
Admitted into the R. W. Grand Encampment of Rhode Island,
Monday, August 4, 1873.
Installed Most Worthy Grand Patriarch,
Wednesday, March 7, 1877.
Died in City of Providence, May 10, 1877.
Aged 37 Years.

From brief online research, hopefully correct:  [corrections and additions requested!]

Thomas Rodman Gardiner was born at Lime Rock, Rhode Island, on March 28, 1840, according to the memorial page, though several online trees show his birth as February 22, 1840, though none are sourced.  His parents were William Henry Gardiner and Sarah  Holmes (Bradford) Gardiner, "Sally", who were born in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, respectively.

On June 17, 1863 at Smithfield, Rhode Island, Thomas Rodman Gardiner married Elizabeth Fredericks, daughter of William H. Fredericks and Sophia Mary (Jeffery) Fredericks.  Elizabeth was born about 1846 in New York City.  Thomas and Elizabeth had two children:
  1. Thomas Bradford Gardiner, born August 21, 1863 at Providence, Rhode Island; married Bonnie Louise Ferree
  2. Sophia Holmes Gardiner, born February 26, 1865 at Providence, Rhode Island; married Andrew John Guerin; possibly another marriage
As noted in the memorial, Thomas Rodman Gardiner died at Providence, Rhode Island, on May 10, 1877.  Sadly, his wife Elizabeth died not long after him, on February 22, 1881.  They're buried in the Grace Church Cemetery at Providence, Rhode Island.

In the 1885 Census of Providence, Rhode Island, their daughter Sophia was living with her aunt and/or uncle; she would marry Andrew John Guerin in 1888.  In 1885, Thomas was presumably at college or already started in his career as an engineer, which would eventually lead him to work on the Panama Canal.

If you have corrections and/or additions to the information above, please leave a comment or contact me directly.